Geeked Out

Pour some shook up ramen

20 August, 2010 (12:00) | Geeked Out

A malapropism (AKA dogberryism or acyrologia) is a phrase or word that can substitute to sound like another word phrase. Just like when you have some misheard song lyrics (These are called mondegreens btw), usually these have funny stories if they come up in real life situations. Here are a few examples of ones I’ve come across:

While on a tour at a winery, the tour guide was showing the different sizes of bottles and what they are called and used for. He pointed to a very large one and I swore he said, “This one is the annihilator.” What he really said was, “This one is the nine liter.”

Mahatma Gandhi walked barefoot everywhere, to the point that his feet
became quite thick and hard. He also was quite a spiritual person.
Even when he was not on a hunger strike, he did not eat much and
became quite thin and frail. Due to this diet, he wound up with very
bad breath. Therefore, he came to be known as a . . .

Super calloused fragile mystic plagued with halitosis.

Do you have any examples of #phrases that sound like other phrases?

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  • another I remembered, A friend say “False Alarm” and I replied with “Fossil Arm?”

  • another I remembered, A friend say “False Alarm” and I replied with “Fossil Arm?”